Thursday, November 25, 2010

#7 Space & #8 Adelaide Ocean Lullaby {10 things I want from Trinidad}


#7 Space | "My joy is stimulated by vast, wide, open spaces, both literally and figuratively"--excerpt from my 2010 artist statement

As a Visionary Space Activator, access to a diversity of spaces is essential to my creative process. Each space contributes to the stimulation of new ideas, awakens my body to unexplored movement. Every space is coded with its own spatial sensitivities, and these unique elements give texture and context to the origin and experience of the movement within that space. There is an infinite variation of movement in all spaces because each breath that we take shifts the nature of any space in a subtle, almost undetectable way. Every space that I encounter then becomes a laboratory of unconditional possibilities, informing my dance in a way that only that cocktail of space and time could.

Trinidad is a vibrant laboratory for JOYISM! for so many reasons. The fact that is a brand new space to my body speaks volumes alone. Another irresistible element of Trinidad is that it is an island, surrounded by oceans. Trinidad's spatial orientation on the planet stimulates a completely different frequency than what the east coast of the United States offers me, with its tall highways and compact concrete. The dance will birth itself anew in Trinidad, and I am eager to activate new spaces within and around me.

#8 Adelaide Ocean Lullaby | The Mother Project work-in-process...

Adelaide Fisher Brown is my great-great grandmother. She is the mother of William Brown, who is the father of Gloria Jean Brown, who is the mother of my father, Wayne. Adelaide was from Barbados, and immigrated to the United States at a very young age. There are little facts still left about her life, and so her story is largely an in-depth intuitive journey. I feel that being in the space of the Caribbean unlock parts of her dance and story that I could not have come across in Washington, DC.

The Mother Project's process engages the intuitive memory of our psychic selves and also the memory pre-coded in our biological DNA. Some strand of me is purely Adelaide, and so the dance is a physical action that gives me a real time connection to a woman who lived and died long before I ever existed. Adelaide Ocean Lullaby is a choreopoem exploring the intuitive direction that is coming through my dancing body. Her story is one of a woman who never dreams that she will be leaving home, and her mother, forever. And so she has to find a way to create peace and mother herself in the United States.

Adelaide's story is still very young in my body, but my dance journey in Trinidad will allow it to mature into its next phases. Read more about the The Mother Project and its early stages at www.dancejoyism.com.


~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Photos: Ganges River, Rishikesh, India February 2006; Coast of Seminyak, Bali, Indonesia, May 2006

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

#6 Carnival {10 things I want from Trinidad}

“The soul of the people is in its dance…”

Imagine. A whole country dancing, everyone finding some rhythm in the body, some interpretation of the space, and sharing it with the whole. This is paradise to me. Not just the fancy costumes, and Trinidad’s tropical climate, and the sensual abundance of the f├ęte—but Carnival as the ultimate communal dance jam is ecstasy to me! It is massive, and the whole island stops to commemorate its majesty. This is ancient genius at its best, an annual ritual where everybody belongs! Again, in the expert opinion of a Visionary Space Activator, the human community’s collective dance is how we reach world peace. Carnival is literally how we move in love.

I first heard of Carnival in a GQ magazine when I was about 16. A big feature story opened with a Carnival Queen’s huge gold feathers taking up both pages. I remember thinking, “I belong in her world. There is something here for me.” A few months after coming across the article, my friend Keita’s mother, who was from Trinidad, took a group of us to Washington, DC’s Carnival in June 1998. My life was transformed forever.

HOW I had managed to grow up in DC, just across town from this annual communal soul celebration and never know about it, blew my mind. I was soooooo at home in Carnival's street, being carried by the force of the people down Georgia Avenue. The loud bands blasting music from the trucks, the mud people streaking through us with glee. Keita’s mom bought all of us Trini flags to wave in the air, and we jumped and danced down the mashed up parade—I was in heaven!

After that little taste of dance divine, I started to crave more and more carnival. I wanted to go to New York’s labor day carnival, and then to Toronto’s…I wanted to dance in every carnival there was. I read After the Dance: A walk through Jacmel, by Edwidge Danticat (one of my favorites), and wanted to dance Haiti’s carnival. I decided I was part Bahiain somewhere in my blood and wanted to go to Salvador’s carnival. But more than any other country, I wanted to know Trinidad’s carnival. That instant resonation I felt all those years ago as a teen flipping through pages of a magazine is still strong within my spirit today.

As a Visionary Space Activator who has spent much of her life in places where movement is not fully celebrated, who grew up in a country where the closest thing to national celebration is the Superbowl—Carnival presents the ultimate opportunity to dance in peace with my tribe of indigenous dancing, booty-shaking, soul gyrating humans. Such people are certainly scattered throughout all nations. But the intensity of a million dancing bodies in one place is a spiritual retreat for someone like me who is often the only body dancing up the space. I have been loved and feared alike in the United States for my spontaneous, open space dance process. I am excited to surrender myself to the communal movement, where it's already understood that everyone can dance here.

As much as I have wanted to experience Trinidad’s carnival for myself, I have also always wanted to witness life in the country when it wasn’t carnival time. So, I chose to start my dance residency in November and stay through the winter (we’ll there is no winter in Trinidad!) months and participate in carnival in March. I am sure what little I think I know about Carnival will be exploded into a symphony of wondrous, paradoxical happenings. Whatever it is I do finally experience, the dance will lead me through!

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

#5 A Proper Whine {10 things I want from Trinidad}

“a liberated booty is a liberated being!”—moi

As a Bootyist, I celebrate booty dances from around the world. With my constantly spinning, gyrating, swaying booty, I invite humanity to intentionally activate its booty. I believe that total booty liberation enables us to heal ourselves, honor the sacred origins of all life, and elevate one of our most powerful assets…pun intended! It is no coincidence that I am gravitating to a country where booty liberation is already a part of the communal kinetic consciousness. The “whine” is Trinidad’s contribution to planetary booty activation. Ever since setting this Trinidad program in motion, my booty has been bursting with spontaneous, ecstatic praise in anticipation of the awesome whine, whine, whine…

If you’ve been around me just once, you know that my rotating booty is a vibrant space, a force field of ancient proportions, a mega-rotation of intergalactic transmissions. My booty spins and I can feel the happenings of a thousand other places across the globe. My booty dips and I can feel the Earth tilting on its axis. My booty rocks and I am inside the high and low tide of every ocean. My shaking booty downloads the subtlest of vibrations from near and far, and activates my strong intuitive powers.

My activated booty is the indigenous intel processor. When I need to digest or communicate important ideas, information, and emotions, the booty aids me in expressing my truth, allowing me to speak in my authentic voice. In my ongoing study of all things booty, I have come to understand that the booty has an infinite range of motion. The booty can journey through every mood, enabling us to release what we don’t need and receive what we want. The more we exercise our booty’s innate powers, the more we experience the benefits of booty liberation.

A liberated booty is as much a physical phenomenon as it is a psychic, mental, and emotional phenomenon. When our conscious booty is expanding, our physical booty reiterates the expansion. The evidence of a thoroughly liberated booty is seen in all aspects of one’s life: the ultimate fluidity of one’s dance, an appreciation for one’s beautiful, bountiful booty, a zest for life and the gratitude that our dancing body activates that life…to name a few!

As much as I shake my booty, I too have more booty frequencies to activate, more dimensions of my booty to liberate. When I roll to the right, everything is open and flowing easily. But on the left, it’s like the rhythm hits potholes and my rotation hiccups over muscles that need to stretch anew. Saturating my booty with the Trini whine will inevitably increase my booty’s capacity to thrive in more abundant ways. My new booty powers are going to transform my whole life; this i do know.

No matter where you are physically, you can also always tap into my dance journey by shaking your own booty. I can feel the booty activation love at all times, so don’t hesitate to send some booty-joy-beams my way. Just dip into the cosmic booty spin, and ride the frequency of liberated booty consciousness…all booties welcome!

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Photos by Caroline Angelo

Monday, November 22, 2010

#4 Bake N' Shark {10 things I want from Trinidad}

For Marva, my Trini fairy godmother

Firstly, I know nothing about bake n' shark, except that I will stretch my vegetarian-esque palette enough to try it—a local Trini dish comprised of fried shark meat between fried dough with sensational toppings—at least once. But, this post is actually about my Trini fairy godmother, Marva Telemaque (nee Morris), who was the first person to ever mention the words "bake n' shark" to me. In telling me about one of her homeland's classic culinary treats, she reactivated my already heightened fascination with all things Trinidadian. Even more, she watered the seeds of my Trinidad journey long before I knew it was going to grow.

I met Marva through divine intervention. 6 years ago, on my first day as a temp at the Grey Box, which many of you affectionately call, The Washington Post, I had a choice between working with the "Auto Advertising Service Team" or the "Jobs Advertising Service Team." I chose Jobs because at least I could look for other jobs while I worked. When I was escorted to my new section, Marva was the first person I met. I remember thinking, "Oh, I've definitely chosen the right place!" A bright, bubbly woman with locs just like mine greeted me with warm eyes and a big smile. Moments after introducing myself to everyone, Marva called me over to her desk. With the prerogative all mothers take with their children, she looked right through me and said in a bold, demanding way, "Chile, what are you doing here! You are not supposed to be pushing papers like this. Hurry up and get on with the dance!"

I was stunned, she'd just met me and confirmed what at the time I was not ready to embrace. I had just finished college, and felt pressured to "do something" with the degree. Of course, I couldn't tell you what or where I wanted to be. I knew I wanted to dance in some capacity, but did not possess the confidence to craft my journey. Looking back I see the synchronicity of wandering into Marva's section. Everyday for the 9 months I worked in the Grey Box, Marva asked me, "how's the dance?" or "what have you done for the dance today?" She held me accountable to my dreams, when they were rickety and fragile with fear, merely secrets sketched between the pages of my journals. Marva's love and faith nurtured my embryonic creative powers during a pivotal gestation period. There are times when we need someone else to be our dreams' advocate, and I am eternally grateful that Marva was so generous with her spirit.

Marva also shared her art with me. She wrote poems everyday about dance, her art, her children Charlene and Justin—the loves of her life, her prayers for humanity, her spiritual devotion. Marva, or Marva Maah! as I grew to call her, taught me the power of positive intention and how our thoughts and words set the path in motion. Oftentimes we would go to lunch together and she would tell me stories of her life, of Carnival, of her family in Trinidad, of her experience of the United States. She would paint glorious pictures of how one day, when she moved back home, and I was a world-famous dancer, I would be her guest while dancing in Trinidad. And we would go to the beach sometime, and get the bake n' shark, and then go dance to the steel pan band.

It is the ultimate irony that on the eve of my Trinidad journey, I have lost all contact with Marva. And so I write this with the prayer that someone will reconnect us very soon. Perhaps she is even already there in Trinidad and we will bump into each other on Maracas Beach, where bake n' shark apparently originated, and have our long overdue reunion. A few nights ago I had a dream that we found each other, so I figure that's a good sign. I will close out with Marva's classic mantra, very appropriate for all of us needing the extra push towards our dreams sometimes, and the reminder that we are the ones responsible for our happiness: "DOOOO YOOOO CHILE!"

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Sunday, November 21, 2010

#3 Sisters {10 things I want from Trinidad}

“You will always need other women…”—every wise woman I know

The journey that I have been on is blessed by countless numbers of women, sisters, midwives to my dreams. I move forward into my dance evolution with a daily awareness and gratitude that I have been loved and supported at all times by strong, beautiful, courageous women.

My mother Debra, whose life stories sparked the early seeds of The Mother Project, has 3 sisters and one brother. I was envious of her as a girlchild, growing up amongst all boys. “Where are my sisters?” I would want to know, especially after my mother’s 3rd and last child had the audacity to be another boy! I thought some injustice had been committed upon me, surely all girls deserve sisters in their lives.

I decided that there had to be another way towards sisterhood for those of us whose mothers’ wombs only brought forth one daughter. Early on I started making sisters out of friends, pouring my heart into relationships with other girls and women so that a sisterhood would be born and sustained. I am happy to say that many of these sisterships still exist, strengthened every year by a mutual love and commitment to being honest with each other through all of life’s twist and turns.

When I travel, I always find sisters. In Ghana, Clara Yaa Nsiah Asantewa took me as her own, guiding me through sacred places so that I could discover the land and its people for myself. I was also blessed to have Esther and Abenaa Opoku as my first homestay sisters in Kumasi, who lovingly honored me as their “big” sister. In Bali, I formed an instant bond with my roommate Ying from Thailand. We spoke little of the same verbal language, but connected on the unseen vibrational frequencies that allow us to gravitate towards our tribe.

It always amazes me how fast we can create a bond with another person, an instant understanding that we are a part of each other’s lives, and that this new union is actually quite ancient. It is in the re-membering of our soul family that we are reacquainted with people who have been a part of our tribe for centuries, millennia before this present day.

It was also in Bali that I met Amber RainMa. When I first saw her, I was speechless. It really was like looking in a mirror. We don’t share the same physical features, but our spirits are so similar, it was like seeing my soul-twin. Amber was not as awestruck as me; she said, “You are seeing yourself in me, that’s all.” Even though I have only seen her once more in over 4 years, as my sister she has been a constant source of love-spiration for all of my dreams, a healing beam of wisdom in moments of doubt.

I felt like a sister-magnet in India. Only several hours off the plane in Bangalore, and I was surrounded by a throng of bright-saried women, all picking at my pink and yellow clothes, pulling at my tightly-twisted, fresh Bantu knots (amazing what hairdos you can work up on a 20 hour flight!). I remember feeling quite calm, not at all violated or threatened by their curious touch. It instantly reminded me of the intimacy of sisters, the allowances not hindered by formalities or barriers. There is an organic warmth, a knowing that we’re all “related,” some way or another.

The Indian women were speaking to me, asking me questions, expecting answers. All I could do was smile. I felt like my tongue was broken, having not recalled the codes for the Kannada language in this lifetime. But they saw themselves in me, they looked at our brown skin, our vibrant colors, our inviting smiles and recognized me as their own, in spite of a tongue evaporated with distance and time.

There is a sensitivity amongst women that I celebrate. It is in the nuances, the check-ups, the tenderness that we bring to each other that makes sisterhood so sweet. It is in the way we read each other’s minds, forgive each other’s diss when that on-again-off-again heartache calls us away, make each other sweet things when we need to be nourished, raise each other’s confidence when we have lost faith in ourselves.

Sistering allows us the space to mother, and be mothered by women who are our peers, women who are not judging us, but seeing their reflections in us. Sistering supports the flexible imperative that womanhood brings. Sisters know that we are not just one type of woman, but that we morph and grow and discover new parts of ourselves each day. Sisters know that we need support through all our phases. Their support is unconditional and doesn't demand logical explanations when we change our personality/identity/relationship status/job/location/mood… Sisters just know that we are always in flux, flowing in a myriad of frequencies, encountering fear-laced illusions along the path towards self-directed realities.

The sisters in the Washington, DC community have held me close when I needed to cry, fed me food when I was too numb to eat, got me to dance when I was stiff with heartbreak, made me laugh when I needed to remember my joybeamself. The sisters here have been good to me in too many ways to write about today (but FYI, I could write a book or few, for each sister and how you have enriched my life!).

The sisters here and all over the world have helped me birth the dance journey that is my life’s work. I know there are more sisters coming into my life in just a few days. I am so grateful for ALL OF MY SISTERS, the ones I know, and the ones I am yet to know across the waters in Trinidad.

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Saturday, November 20, 2010

#2 Community {10 things I want from Trinidad}

Binahkaye means “the dancer radiates OUR awesome powers”.

It has always been important to me to orient myself and my movement as a part of the community. As a dancer who values the contribution of every human being’s dance to our world, I reflect the infinite possibilities of the people’s dreams with my vibrant dancing body. When we dance, we paint testimonials of humanity with our bodies, etching the air and space with the purest expression of what we are choosing to experience right now. Coding our muscles with memories of our journey, and the knowledge gathered along the way, our dance at times is wiser than we know ourselves to be.

My dance evolution was steeped in communal awareness from a young age. It was in high school that I first fell in love with facilitating dance in communal, non-traditional spaces. At the church where I grew up, I nurtured the creative expression of women and girls who didn’t know that they too had something unique and essential to share when they danced. At the time I didn’t know that I was planting seeds for processes and approaches to movement that would form the core of my artistic journey.

I LOVE that feeling when I am dancing with someone who is at the beginning of her creative revolution. It is like watching someone give birth to her power, a power that was always there, but waiting to be actualized by the individual. That is what our dancing bodies do—they activate the innate creative force within us, enabling us with insights and wisdom that enrich our lives, propelling us toward greater realities.

Sometimes it is challenging to explain my perspectives on movement. It took me several years before I felt confident enough to express that I am not “teaching” you how to dance because you already know “how” to dance. Rather, I am encouraging you to TRUST your dance, to believe in your process enough to share your dance with us. I recognize that every person on the planet has a sacred dance that is like a vital ingredient in the recipe for world peace, love, and prosperity. If one person’s dance is compromised, the “soup is off”, humanity misses out on something. This awareness fuels my passion and my mission to dance with as many people on the planet as possible. EVERYONE has that essential piece we need to make the whole.

It was in Ghana, 8 years ago in a small village called Adalku in the Volta region where I danced one of the best dances of my life. A storm flew down onto the dirt, the mud softened my feet, and I was soaked in ecstatic praise as musicians clanged weathered metal parts together, conjuring up ancient spirits and savory beats.

I loved the participatory, inter-generational process of the community’s dance. Somewhere in my soul, the Divine whispered, “this is home.” Not home, as in a physical place, but home as in, this is where I am to birth my creative genius, here inside humanity’s dance.

Shortly after the dance in Adalku, a poem came to me, its opening lines becoming the mantra for the early stages of my career: “The Most Beautiful Dance You Do, Is the One You Do With Your People.” As I have journeyed and grown over the years, I continue to delve into my fascination with the organic movement that springs forth from communal dance exchanges. In Trinidad, I am eager to experience the frequencies of the people’s dance, the sway of the crowd, the gait of the walk, the dip of the back, the flutter of feet, the spin of a nation.

Every element of the community’s dance empowers the exploration within my own body, thereby allowing me to acknowledge and honor the ways in which the people express their truth. Imagine the global shift if we all valued and honored each other’s movement as a beautiful contribution to our lives. This sharing process cultivates the preservation and expansion of the human community’s dance. This is how WE dance towards peace, this how WE move in love.

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Photos by Caroline Angelo

Thursday, November 18, 2010

10 things I want from Trinidad: #1 Love


In ten days I begin the biggest journey of my life, thus far.

I studied dance and cultural arts in Ghana for a semester in college. That experience rocked my world, exploded my identities, and cracked the shell of my slow-to-bloom artistic freedom. 8 years later, after travels to India and Indonesia, after launching my own company, after acknowledging my creative super powers, after honing an advanced intuitive awareness, after falling in love with my highly-sensitive emotional artself--I am happy to report that I still know nothing. That when it comes to this journey to Trinidad, I am humbly, and courageously, a mother in labor, yet to birth myself along this path of cosmic unknowns.

I literally am growing into a whole new journey, one that will undoubtedly change my life forever, and activate awesome new portals of myself. Am I excited? YES! Am I freaked out and feeling scared? Yeah that comes too at times, sometimes several times a day. The faith in the journey is like the harness on a roller coaster ride. You get in. You say YES to the adventure. You strap yourself in because as you climb that steep hill, as your stomach falls into your toes, you know that the straps will keep you there, through the scariest parts of it, even when you want to turn back. There's no way out, only a way forward. Such is the same with faith, faith that all the pieces that need to come together will do so as I am ready to receive them. This faith is what keeps me moving forward amidst a vast ocean of uncertainty, inevitable storms of fear, and the gnawing illusion that home is a place outside of myself.


This is me, having contractions, 10 days out from a 6AM flight at DCA. My journey is coming.

In preparation of my journey, and because it is vitally important to me that the community be a part of JOYISM!'s inaugural international dance residency, I am initiating a series of essays entitled, "10 things I want from Trinidad". The series is inspired by the lovely Margaux Delotte-Bennett who created a list, "10 things I want from India," and incorporated the list into her one-woman show Black & Kinky Amongst Brown Waves. I will publish one "thing"/essay per day, as we count down to the start of the next phase of my life. I will also continue to write extensively about my travels and dance journeys in Trinidad over the coming months. Thank you for being a part of the dance!


#1 Love | in all forms, at all times. Love informs this whole dance journey of mine, at every juncture. Through every challenging, oftentimes painful, growth process that brings me to the present moment, love is the constant miracle. Especially when I am at the bottom of hope, when I am scared about taking the next step towards the inevitable expansion of a breaking heart, love pulses on.

Love is the nectar of my journey, the energy of creation that will push me, pull me, dance with me throughout the many dreams I will manifest along the way. Love is everywhere, and I am so happy that I know this to be true! I have been to many patches of the globe and have always experienced tremendous, genuine love from families, from professors, from guides, from strangers, from everybody.

I am excited to know love in a new world, to taste love with the spices and sensations of Trinidad's sacred, ancient, wondrous spaces, to awaken new capacities to love and be loved in returned, to feel the tender embrace of love and allow it to blossom within me.

Love is a process of knowing self, and radiating that awareness through one's life. This journey to Trinidad is my love supreme.

~~~~
Stay tuned to the JOYISM! blog for the complete series, "10 things I want from Trinidad." Also, I will be writing about my dance journeys in Trinidad and posting them to the JOYISM! blog. Subscribe to the blog, join JOYISM!'s mailing list, "like" JOYISM! on facebook--stay connected to the dance!

Contribute! Make a donation to JOYISM!'s Trinidad dance residency at any time. Your support is always appreciated and is strengthening my ability to create dance and peaceful exchanges with communities around the world. Find out more about my program in Trinidad at www.dancejoyism.com.

Photos by Colin Danville